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Moving Beyond Pretense: Nuclear Power and Nonproliferation
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Published on: Jun 2014
Notes:

The further proliferation and possible use of nuclear weapons are among the very greatest threats to U.S. and international security, yet most governments and industry officials downplay the risks of civilian nuclear technology and materials being diverted to make bombs and use this optimistic assessment in formulating U.S. and international nuclear trade and nonproliferation policies.  

This volume taps the insights and analyses of 13 top nuclear and security experts to weigh the validity of their narrative. The result is a comprehensive counternarrative that recommends a significant tightening of current nonproliferation controls.  

This book is published online by the U.S. Army War College's Strategic Studies Institute, where it is possible to order hard copies of the book.

Published by:

The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College
Edited by NPEC executive director, Henry Sokolski - 2014

 

Nuclear Weapons Materials Gone Missing: What Does History Teach?
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Published on: Mar 2014
Notes:
Ever since President Obama made securing nuclear weapons assets a top priority for his global arms control agenda, guarding and disposing of these holdings have become an international security preoccupation. Starting in 2010, multilateral nuclear summits on how to prevent nuclear theft and sabotage have been held every two years – the first in Washington, the second in Seoul, the third in The Hague. Scores of studies have been commissioned and written, and nearly as many workshops (official and unofficial) have been held.
 
Yet, in all of this, the urgent task of securing and disposing of known nuclear weapons assets has all but sidelined what to do about nuclear weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium that we have lost track of. This is understandable. It also is worrisome.
 
How likely is it that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) could detect even a large amount of MUF in a timely fashion at declared civilian nuclear sites? What of national means of detection? What can we learn from the history of civilian MUF discoveries in Japan and the UK and of military MUF in the United States and South Africa? How well can the IAEA or any existing nuclear material accountancy system track the production of special nuclear material or account for past production?
 
This volume gives us more than a few answers. Much of the analysis is technical. Most of it, technical or not, is downbeat. The good news is that this is the first dedicated volume on this specialized topic. There is likely to be more of such histories written in the future. How they might read, however, ultimately will depend on how much unnecessary civilian and military material production is curtailed, which is itself a matter worthy of another book.
Published by:

The Nonproliferation Policy Education Center

Nuclear Weapons Security Crises: What Does History Teach?
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Published on: Jul 2013
Notes:

At the height of the Cultural Revolution a Chinese long-range nuclear missile is fired within the country, and the nuclear warhead it is carrying detonates. A French nuclear device is exploded in Algeria during a coup there. The Soviet empire has collapsed, and shots are fired at a Russian crowd intent on rushing a nuclear weapons-laden plane straining to remove a stash of nuclear weapons to a safer locale. Pakistani civilian governments are routinely pushed aside by a powerful, nuclear-armed military that observers worry might yet itself fall prey to a faction willing to seize a portion of Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal. This volume reveals previously unknown details on each case and teases out what is to be learned. This book is ideal not only for policymakers and analysts, but for historians and teachers as well. 

The book is published online by the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.

Published by:
The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College
Edited by Henry D. Sokolski and Bruno Tertrais - 2013
The Next Arms Race
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Published on: Jul 2012
Notes:

 With New START now being implemented with Russia, it has become fashionable to push for even far deeper cuts, perhaps as low as several warheads on each side. Such low numbers, though, approach what other nuclear weapons states, such as France, China, Israel, India, and Pakistan, either have or plan to get. 

How compatible are deeper U.S.-Russian reductions with the nuclear activities and plans of other states? How does Russia view the nuclear and conventional military modernization activities of China? How might the continuing military competition between Pakistan and India play out? What are the strategic nuclear dynamics between the DPRK, South Korea, Japan, and China with both their current and planned military and civilian nuclear activities? Are military nuclear competitions in the Middle East using civilian nuclear programs as covers inevitable? What beyond our current arms control and nonproliferation efforts might help address these threats?

The Next Arms Race, which is the result of a three-year project, showcases 15 research papers that tackle these questions directly. It is published online by the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute, where it is possible to order hard copies of the book. 

Published by:

 The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College

Edited by NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2012

Pure Risk: Federal Clean Energy Loan Guarantees
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Published on: Apr 2012
Notes:

Up until the controversy surrounding the default of the Solyndra Corporation on its federal clean energy loan guarantee in November of 2011, such guarantees enjoyed broad-based bipartisan support. Not any longer. First, President Obama failed to include any monies in his proposed fiscal year 2013 budget to Congress for such loans. Next, fiscal House conservatives held a series of oversight hearings on the Solyndra debacle. Pure Risk examines what risks remain for the billions of dollars of loan guarantees that have already been made and that the Department of Energy plans yet to make. The volume includes the perspectives of leading energy experts from the fiscal Right to the environmental Left and includes analysis done by the U.S. Congressional Budget Office.

Published by:

Nonproliferation Policy Education Center
Edited by NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2012

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The Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC), is a 501 (c)3 nonpartisan, nonprofit, educational organization
founded in 1994 to promote a better understanding of strategic weapons proliferation issues. NPEC educates policymakers, journalists,
and university professors about proliferation threats and possible new policies and measures to meet them.
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